Reply To: Let’s explore and discuss local examples of cycling infrastructure

Home Forums Module 2 – Linear Infrastructure: Lanes, Paths, and Streets Let’s explore and discuss local examples of cycling infrastructure Reply To: Let’s explore and discuss local examples of cycling infrastructure

#26375
Richard Seager
Participant

a) what incremental improvement would you recommend for this particular example, and
b) what kind of political and bureaucratic opposition this improvement would likely encounter (such as removal of parking, fire trucks, etc… )

This road Bankfield Terrace shown leading off Kirkstall Road, Leeds (#26213) is probably the closest to what we have in Dunedin, NZ/Aotearoa being somewhat similar to some of the University precinct in North Dunedin. For example here;

https://bit.ly/3dOjEJ9

Currently there is very little bicycle infrastructure in the University precinct and what is there is poor and often quite a lot less than 1.8 metres wide for example.

a. I’d prefer to turn Dundas Street into a cycling street as I would like to do to the entire University Precinct. But incrementally? It’d turn both Bankfield and Dundas into one way streets with traffic calming (speed bumps or judder bars as we call them locally, chicanes for the cars, a new word for me but which I gather means cars parked on either side of the street in 3/4 car increments, and a clear indication via colour of the road that bicycles are prioritised, Amsterdam red seems good but Dunedin seems to have decided on green. Also I’d include lots of spots to park bikes preferably with ability to lock them up as an unattached bike would disappear pretty quickly in North Dunedin. I can’t see why this could not be a simple metal ring set into the road which you can lift up to attach your lock chain to it (not sure if this is done anywhere).

b. The University Vice Chancellor, likely the Green Party Mayor of Dunedin and probably 70-90% of the city councilors would oppose this. As would the movers and shakers of this town who still havn’t had the good sense to move aside. Their focus is still on cars. The Green (in name only) Mayor Aaron Hawkins has shown no interest in cycling infrastructure (albeit he might not publicly oppose it) and there are several councilors (of 14) who definitely would actively oppose such measures. A few of the remaining councilors would probably just let the noisy ones decide so I’d suspect the majority of the current council would effectively oppose the measure. I have confidence in only one of the fourteen and he would be possibly curtailed by his own (Labour) party. The planners on the Council would also likely oppose it as they seem more keen on playing Twister;

Twister – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twister_(game)

Council planners in action (this has been widely ridiculed in NZ) – https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/local-government/121557561/city-council-runs-circles-over-dunedins-main-shopping-streets

The Council’s long term plan for changes to the main shopping street, George St, are slightly better although not good enough mainly due to the cycle part of their plan including lanes maybe 1 – 1.5 metres wide which includes most of the current (there’s not very much) urban cycle infrastructure in Dunedin.

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