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  • in reply to: Post a Picture – The Weakest Link #26258
    Mark Philpotts
    Participant

    This is the CS2 cycleway just east of the City of London on the A11 Mile End Road. There’s a couple of sections where the protected cycle track ends and people end up cycling in a part time bus lane where people can park/ drive outside the hours of operation. Definitely a weak link. https://goo.gl/maps/wsway4JTvghmQChC9

    Mark Philpotts
    Participant

    In reply to Charles Halliday’s Cedar Road photo.

    It’s a good little example of taking an opportunity to make cycling more connected. Improvements I’d suggest;

    At the western end I’d remove the kerbs running across the end of the cycle track for a smoother transition and I wouldn’t bother with give way markings as people are not having to give way to any main road here. I would also swap the bollard for something in white so it is more conspicuous to people cycling.

    At the eastern end, the use of the corduroy tactile paving is an attempt to create a bit of shared space before people cycling rejoin the carriageway. The paving on the cycle track should be the tram type from tram and ladder tacile paving, but even that is a little messy still. Perhaps the cycle track could have ended in a little junction with the pedestrian crossing space being flanked by blister paving which might be a bit tidier. Also again, a white bollard would help.

    In terms of opposition, I’m not sure you’d actually get any for a few tweaks.

    Mark Philpotts
    Participant

    Flame Tree Path Construction

    This link connects a new residential development to an existing one and provides a quick cut through for walking and cycling. It was originally designed as an emergency access, but when I worked for the local authority highways department, we convinced them to make it cycling friendly.

    The path is 3.1m wide which meets the access requirements of the London Fire Brigade. The centre bollard is removable to allow fire access, but generally only when there’s an ongoing incident that they need a secondary access point. The team used this as a learning experience being the first proper cycle track built in the authority area for over 20 years (and what was already there was poor).

    We took knowledge from this scheme and refined it for other projects, but sadly, the political administration changed, became very hostile to walking and cycling and very little has been build since. I know work for a consultant applying my learning to other projects. Location here. The last laugh was that the new development has streets named after trees, so we got this link officially named as “Flame Tree Path”.

    Mark Philpotts
    Participant

    I’m Mark and I’m a designer specialising in walking and cycling design, although in many cases, the design is about keeping motor traffic moving if you think about it!

    I’m interested in how the “stuff” of streets fit together to make a whole and I guess my knowledge of the details may help here.

    I’m on Twitter as @RantyHighwayman

     

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